Music is something incredible

Music is something incredible

Your child will love what you do, no matter how well or how badly he thinks he can sing! Rapping, singing and making spoken rhymes serves both to draw your attention and to amuse you. Whatever you do, try to do it with energy and confidence, keeping the experience fun for both. Look for opportunities to be in touch with other parents and their children to share music together. This allows children to get used to sharing fun with a social group, long before preschool.

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Music is something incredible


Calm a crying baby.
It captures the attention of any child.
It provides opportunities for even the very young to communicate with an adult long before they can speak.
Encourage babies to watch and listen.
But above all, it’s fun.
You will share your first musical moments with your child since you lull him, sing him or use a soft musical tone to calm him or communicate with him. Load it in a position where the baby can study your face and entertain it with simple rhymes while you rock and curl up. Touch your fingers and toes as you sing or gently move the baby’s arms to the rhythm of the tune.
As your baby becomes more able to respond, pause so that he can make sounds during the silences you make and then start a simple “baby conversation” by repeating the sounds he makes. You will be surprised at the time you are able to keep doing this and it is a very valuable step for learning the communication skills that your child will need to develop later.
Older babies and children between 1 and 3 years old can be held and chanted while one dances and marches to the rhythm of the music. From an early age, teach a wide variety of music from different parts of the world, either recorded or using your own voice and rhythm.
Find rhymes that teach your child things about the world, such as body parts, counting skills, simple position words such as “up” and “down”. In general, words are easier to learn when they are linked to actions and movements.
Try music and rhythms that reflect different moods during the day; soft music for times when you need reassurance and quick music when you need to do something or move. Try not to have music or television all the time, or the child will soon learn to ignore them.
We all improve our singing by simply singing more.
Your child will love what you do, no matter how well or how badly he thinks he can sing! Rapping, singing and making spoken rhymes serves both to draw your attention and to amuse you. Whatever you do, try to do it with energy and confidence, keeping the experience fun for both. Look for opportunities to be in touch with other parents and their children to share music together. This allows children to get used to sharing fun with a social group, long before preschool.
Music attracts all ages, making it an ideal activity to share in family groups. Since the music is so nice and eye-catching, children can develop all kinds of skills through it. For example, musical approaches are especially useful for children who need an additional boost in their overall development, language or learning.
They also provide a “medium” for communication, even if a child can not use language. For children who are no longer so babies, try using or making simple percussion instruments to shake (maracas), hit (drums) or scratch (strings).

 

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