Tag: Music therapy

Music therapy

Music therapy

Music therapy, Production, Production
Musicians maintain better brain connectivity even in resting state. Music learning is a multisensory motor experience that usually begins at an early age. Playing an instrument requires several skills: the rapid reading of a complex symbolic system (most often simultaneous in different "keys", as with the piano), its translation to a sequential motor bimanual activity that is feedbacked by a return Multisensorial on the produced notes and the accompanying emotionality that accompanies the interpretation. Although we are not fully aware of the musical interpretation, unlike other motor activities, it requires a perfect synchronization of various actions organized hierarchically along with an obvious control of tonal production. All this implies a special dedication of the cognitive func...
Music and Psychoactives

Music and Psychoactives

Adequate Stimulation, Music and Psychoactives
Music and Psychoactives. Psicodelia is the adaptation to English of the English psychedelia, a neologism formed from the Greek words ψυχή, "soul", and δήλομαι, "to manifest". The word psychedelic was invented by the British psychologist Humphry Osmond and means "manifesting the soul". By adjusting to this definition, all efforts to project the inner world of the psyche can be considered, in a broad sense, "psychedelic." However, when talking about psychedelia is usually referred to a very specific artistic modality: psychedelic art, especially pictorial and musical, which developed from the second half of the twentieth century. This type of art is characterized by evoking the experiences of the psychedelic experience: synesthesia, alteration of the perception of time and the sense of i
Music therapy for tinnitus

Music therapy for tinnitus

Music and health
Music therapy for tinnitus The treatment of Music therapy for tinitus shows good results Tinnitus - or ringing in the ears - affects 50 million Americans. At Duke University, audiologists successfully treated some of the most serious cases with another sound: music. Imagine you go through life with this as the background noise: "a sharp buzz that was more or less constant, it never goes away," said Steve Cooper, a patient with tinnitus. It's what Cooper's life has been like. He has been listening to that sharp timbre off and on for decades. The problem began after college, a time when he attended a lot of rock concerts strong. Tinnitus often comes from some form of hearing loss and is common among older adults. Doctors, however, are seeing younger patients who have been exposed t...
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